Posts tagged ‘Appeal’

July 11, 2011

£9m raised for East Africa appeal

11 July 2011 Last updated at 11:58 GMT The UK charity appeal to help people affected by severe drought in the Horn of Africa has so far raised £9m.

A group of UK aid agencies launched the fund-raising appeal with a series of TV and radio broadcasts on Friday.

Thousands of families in desperate need of food and water have trekked for days from Somalia to the Dadaab refugee camp in eastern Kenya.

The drought is the worst in East Africa for 60 years. The UN described it as a “humanitarian emergency”.

Brendan Gormley, chief executive of the Disasters Emergency Committee, said the British public had been “remarkably generous, despite many having to tighten their belts”.

But he added that vulnerable people were dying and millions were at risk.

“We need to act fast to prevent more lives being lost,” he said.

The Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) appeal was first broadcast by the BBC on Friday.

Continue reading the main story DEC is an umbrella organisation representing a number of aid agenciesParticipants in the appeal include ActionAid, Age UK, British Red Cross, Cafod, Care International UK, Christian Aid, Concern Worldwide, Islamic Relief, Merlin, Oxfam, Plan UK, Save the Children, Tearfund and World VisionTo make a donation call 0370 60 60 900 (charged at national rate) or post a donation to PO Box 999 London EC3A 3AAComedian Lenny Henry fronted the BBC TV appeal while broadcaster Kate Adie voiced a radio version. Within 24 hours the total raised passed the £6m mark.

The British public donated more than £1m to individual charities even before the DEC appeal was launched. Save the Children had received £560,000, Oxfam £277,000 and the Red Cross £150,000.

Thousands of destitute people were on the move into Kenya and Ethiopia, Mr Gormley said.

More than 1,400 people a day were arriving in the Dadaab camp, already thought to be the world’s largest with a population of 350,000. A similar number are crossing into Ethiopia.

Many of those reaching the camps are severely malnourished children, some of whom have died soon after arriving.

Continue reading the main story Extended drought is causing a severe food crisis in the Horn of Africa, which includes Kenya, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia. Weather conditions over the Pacific means the rains have failed for two seasons and are unlikely to return until September. Food shortages are affecting up to 12 million people. The UN has not declared a famine but large areas of the region are now classified as in crisis or emergency, with malnutrition affecting up to 35-40% of children under five. The humanitarian problem is made worse by ongoing conflicts, which means that until July militant groups had only allowed aid organisations limited access to large parts of southern Somalia and eastern Ethiopia. Since the beginning of 2011, around 15,000 Somalis each month have fled into refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia looking for food and water. The refugee camp at Dadaab, in Kenya, has been overwhelmed by 370,000 people. Farmers unable to meet their basic food costs are abandoning their herds. High cereal and fuel prices had already forced them to sell many animals before the drought and their smaller herds are now unprofitable or dying. The refugee problem may have been preventable. However, violent conflict in the region has deterred international investment in long-term development programmes, which may have reduced the effects of the drought. Development aid would focus on reducing deforestation, topsoil erosion and overgrazing and improving water conservation. New roads and infrastructure for markets would help farmers increase their profits. The result of climate conditions, conflict and lack of investment is that 6.7 million people in Kenya and Ethiopia are currently existing on food rations, and relief agencies estimate 2.6 million in Somalia will need assistance a new emergency operation. BACK {current} of {total} NEXT The UK has pledged £38m in food aid to drought-hit Ethiopia – enough to feed 1.3 million people for three months.

The DEC appeal will help people in Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia and South Sudan, which officially separated from the Republic of Sudan on Saturday.

Aid agencies, including the Kenyan Red Cross, the Somali Red Crescent and Action Aid, are being helped by local groups to access remote areas with food, water and medical treatment.

UK International Development Secretary Andrew Mitchell welcomed the appeal launch.

He said he was lobbying other governments to “do their bit”.

“This situation needs an international response and Britain is calling on the international community to provide the fast, effective relief that Ethiopia needs now in this difficult time,” he said.

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July 11, 2011

£6m raised for east Africa appeal

The UK charity appeal to help people affected by severe drought in the Horn of Africa has already raised £6m.


A group of UK aid agencies launched the fundraising appeal with a series of TV and radio broadcasts on Friday.


Thousands of families in desperate need of food and water have trekked for days from Somalia to the Dadaab refugee camp in eastern Kenya.


The drought is the worst in east Africa for 60 years. The UN described it as a “humanitarian emergency”.


Brendan Gormley, chief executive of the Disasters Emergency Committee said the public had responded with “overwhelming generosity to a massive ongoing crisis which is already beginning to claim lives.


“As this vital fundraising continues, together we can help families at risk to survive and start rebuilding their lives.”


The Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) appeal was first broadcast by the BBC on Friday.

Continue reading the main story DEC is an umbrella organisation representing a number of aid agenciesParticipants in the appeal include ActionAid, Age UK, British Red Cross, Cafod, Care International UK, Christian Aid, Concern Worldwide, Islamic Relief, Merlin, Oxfam, Plan UK, Save the Children, Tearfund and World VisionTo make a donation call 0370 60 60 900 (charged at national rate) or post a donation to PO Box 999 London EC3A 3AAComedian Lenny Henry fronted the BBC TV appeal while broadcaster Kate Adie voiced a radio version.


The British public donated more than £1m to individual charities even before the DEC appeal was launched.


Save the Children had received £560,000, Oxfam £277,000 and the Red Cross £150,000.


DEC chief executive Brendan Gormley said thousands of destitute people were on the move into Kenya and Ethiopia.


More than 1,300 people a day were arriving in the Dadaab camp, already thought to be the world’s largest with a population of 350,000.


A similar number are crossing into Ethiopia.


Many of those reaching the camps are severely malnourished children, some of whom have died soon after arriving.

‘Preventing tragedy’

Mr Gormley said: “Slowly but surely, these people have seen their lives fall apart – crops, livestock and now their homes have been taken by the drought.”


“They’ve been left with no alternative but to seek shelter and life-saving help elsewhere.


“We have a duty to help quickly before the situation spirals out of control.”

Continue reading the main story Extended drought is causing a severe food crisis in the Horn of Africa, which includes Kenya, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia. Weather conditions over the Pacific means the rains have failed for two seasons and are unlikely to return until September. Food shortages are affecting up to 12 million people. The UN has not declared a famine but large areas of the region are now classified as in crisis or emergency, with malnutrition affecting up to 35-40% of children under five. The humanitarian problem is made worse by ongoing conflicts, which means that until July militant groups had only allowed aid organisations limited access to large parts of southern Somalia and eastern Ethiopia. Since the beginning of 2011, around 15,000 Somalis each month have fled into refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia looking for food and water. The refugee camp at Dadaab, in Kenya, has been overwhelmed by 370,000 people. Farmers unable to meet their basic food costs are abandoning their herds. High cereal and fuel prices had already forced them to sell many animals before the drought and their smaller herds are now unprofitable or dying. The refugee problem may have been preventable. However, violent conflict in the region has deterred international investment in long-term development programmes, which may have reduced the effects of the drought. Development aid would focus on reducing deforestation, topsoil erosion and overgrazing and improving water conservation. New roads and infrastructure for markets would help farmers increase their profits. The result of climate conditions, conflict and lack of investment is that 6.7 million people in Kenya and Ethiopia are currently existing on food rations, and relief agencies estimate 2.6 million in Somalia will need assistance a new emergency operation. BACK {current} of {total} NEXT The UK has pledged £38m in food aid to drought-hit Ethiopia – enough to feed 1.3 million people for three months.


The DEC appeal will help people in Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia and South Sudan, which officially separated from the Republic of Sudan on Saturday.


Mr Gormley said: “Of course these people need a long-term solution with investment and political will – but right now it’s about preventing a tragedy.”


Aid agencies, including the Kenyan Red Cross, the Somali Red Crescent and Action Aid, are being helped by local groups to access remote areas with food, water and medical treatment.


UK International Development Secretary Andrew Mitchell welcomed the appeal launch.


He said: “Through no fault of its own, the Horn of Africa is experiencing a severe drought caused by the failed rains.


“The British government is already providing vital food to help 1.3 million people – but more needs to be done and we are lobbying other governments to do their bit.


“We welcome the DEC appeal to help the 10 million men, women and children caught up in the crisis.


“British charities and organisations are on the ground and ready to help, but need this additional support to get emergency supplies to those in desperate need.”

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July 11, 2011

NI ministers in appeal for calm

Martin McGuinness and Peter Robinson Martin McGuinness and Peter Robinson have made an appeal for calm over the summer The first and deputy first ministers have appealed for calm ahead of the annual 12 July parades, after disturbances at the weekend.


A number of police officers were injured during rioting in County Antrim at the weekend.


It followed disturbances in Lurgan and Craigavon last week.


First Minister Peter Robinson said that although there were occasions when feelings might run high, “violence and rioting is not the answer”.


The ministers said “extensive work” had been undertaken by their office with community leaders in recent weeks to identify and calm potential flashpoints.


Mr Robinson called on “everyone to take a step back and think of the consequences before doing something which you will later regret”.

Peaceful summer

“In recent weeks the eyes of the world have focused in on Northern Ireland for both all the right reasons and, unfortunately, all the wrong reasons,” he said.


“As a government we are continuing to work hard to create jobs and investment and to build and grow our economy.


“We must not allow the progress that has been made to be thwarted by those who want to drag us back to the past. We are determined to build a better and brighter future for all in Northern Ireland.


Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness said it was “in the interests of everyone” to ensure that Northern Ireland had a “peaceful summer”.


He said: “A lot of people have devoted many hours to ensuring that there is a bright future for us and our children.


“As a government we are committed to creating a better future for all. Some recent events do not help.


“Issues surrounding a small number of contentious parades need to be resolved.


“I call on elected representatives, community leaders and indeed everyone in positions of authority within local communities to use their influence wisely this summer.”

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July 11, 2011

Man’s NHS weight-loss op appeal

By Branwen Jeffreys Health correspondent, BBC News Thomas Condliff: ‘No gastric bypass means I’ll die’

The Court of Appeal will consider if a patient’s personal circumstances should influence the NHS when it decides whether to fund treatment.


Thomas Condliff, who weighs 22 stone (140kg) and has type 2 diabetes, is challenging a decision to refuse him a gastric bypass operation.


NHS North Staffordshire says he does not meet its criteria for weight loss surgery.


Decisions about exceptional funding are based on medical factors alone.


Mr Condliff, 62, was initially refused funding for a gastric bypass operation because his weight/height ratio (Body Mass Index) fell below the threshold set by his local primary care trust.

Continue reading the main story
It’s awful just being locked indoors. It doesn’t matter where you live, how nice it is, it’s still a cage.”

End Quote Thomas Condliff At 22 stone his Body Mass Index (BMI) is about 43, but in North Staffordshire only patients with a BMI over 50 are routinely treated with weight loss surgery. A decision to refuse him funding as an exceptional case was upheld in an earlier court hearing.


Now Mr Condliff is taking his legal battle to the Court of Appeal in a case that has implications for many other areas.


NHS North Staffordshire makes its decisions for exceptional funding on the medical condition of the patient, and rules out considering their personal circumstances.

Prisoner at home

As a result of his diabetes Tom Condliff has lost the sight in one eye, and he also has kidney problems. He can no longer stand or walk for more than a short time and relies on his wife, Lana, to help him wash and dress.


He says that during his legal battle his quality of life has worsened, and even an extremely calorie-restricted diet has failed to help him lose weight.


“I’ve been given about a year to live by one of the specialists. I feel more and more poorly each day, my diabetes is way out of control.”


Having failed to overturn the initial decision to refuse a gastric bypass, he is now resting his hopes on asking the courts to compel the NHS to take into account the impact on his life and that of his family.


“My wife barely goes out, because she doesn’t want to leave me. It’s awful just being locked indoors. It doesn’t matter where you live, how nice it is, it’s still a cage. “

Human rights challenge

In the two-day hearing, the Court of Appeal will hear evidence from both sides on whether Article 8 of the Human Rights Act should be applied to how the NHS makes decisions on funding. It sets out the broad right to a family life.


In common with many other primary care trusts, North Staffordshire has a policy of only considering medical evidence when it makes decisions about exceptional funding. The trust says it is part of a commitment to deal with all patients in a fair and even handed manner.


In order to be granted exceptional funding a patient has to show he would have a greater than average medical benefit from any treatment.


If Mr Condliff was successful, the PCT would have to look again at his case, but could still reach the same decision. It might also open the door to further legal challenges.

Regional differences

Although this will not be considered by the court the case also highlights the variation in funding for weight loss surgery.


The guidelines for the NHS in England and Wales suggest patients should be considered if they have a BMI of over 40, or lower if they have other serious medical conditions.


The Royal College of Surgeons has argued that many patients who meet those criteria and could benefit from an operation are turned down at local level for NHS treatment.


Judgement in Mr Condliff’s case is set to be reserved until a later date.

July 11, 2011

Aid agencies issue drought appeal


Skip to content Skip to local navigation Skip to bbc.co.uk navigation Skip to bbc.co.uk search Help Accessibility Help BBC News UK Home UK Africa Asia-Pac Europe Latin America Mid-East South Asia US & Canada Business Health Sci/Environment Tech Entertainment Video England Northern Ireland Scotland Wales UK Politics Education Magazine 8 July 2011Last updated at 07:59 GMT Share this page Delicious Digg Facebook reddit StumbleUpon Twitter Email Print East Africa drought: DEC appeals for funds Children walk down a dusty street in Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya on July 4, 2011. More than 1,300 people a day are arriving at the Dadaab Refugee camp A group of UK aid agencies has launched a joint fund-raising appeal to help more than 10 million people affected by severe drought in the Horn of Africa.


Thousands of families in desperate need of food and water have trekked for days from Somalia to the Dadaab refugee camp in eastern Kenya.


The drought is the worst in East Africa for 60 years and the UN described it as a “humanitarian emergency”.


The Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) appeal will be broadcast by the BBC.

Continue reading the main storyDisasters Emergency Committee DEC is an umbrella organisation representing a number of aid agencies. Participants in the appeal include ActionAid, Age UK, British Red Cross, Cafod, Care International UK, Christian Aid, Concern Worldwide, Islamic Relief, Merlin, Oxfam, Plan UK, Save the Children, Tearfund and World Vision. To make a donation call 0370 60 60 900, text ‘CRISIS’ to 70000 to donate £5, post a donation to PO Box 999 London EC3A 3AA Disasters Emergency CommitteeHorn of Africa tested by severe droughtSomalia’s starving pour into violent city Comedian Lenny Henry will front the BBC TV appeal while broadcaster Kate Adie will voice the radio version.


The DEC said more than 1,300 people a day were arriving in the Dadaab camp – already thought to be the world’s largest, with a population of 350,000.


A similar number are crossing into Ethiopia, aid workers say.


Many of those reaching the camps are severely malnourished children, some of whom have died soon after arriving.

‘Duty to help’

“Slowly but surely, these people have seen their lives fall apart – crops, livestock and now their homes have been taken by the drought,” DEC chief executive Brendan Gormley said.

Continue reading the main story#main-content.story .layout-block-a .story-body #ss-africa_drought.story-feature{ width: 304px;}h2.dslideshow-header{padding-left: 8px;}#ss-africa_drought.story-feature div.dslideshow-entries dl.dslideshow-entry p{padding-left: 8px;font-weight: bold;}div.dslideshow-entries{margin-top: -33px;}div#ss-africa_drought{border: 1px solid #BDBDBD;} Extended drought is causing a severe food crisis in the Horn of Africa, which includes Kenya, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia. Weather conditions over the Pacific means the rains have failed for two seasons and are unlikely to return until September.Food shortages are affecting up to 12 million people. The UN has not declared a famine but large areas of the region are now classified as in crisis or emergency, with malnutrition affecting up to 35-40% of children under five. The humanitarian problem is made worse by ongoing conflicts, which means that until July militant groups had only allowed aid organisations limited access to large parts of southern Somalia and eastern Ethiopia.Since the beginning of 2011, around 15,000 Somalis each month have fled into refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia looking for food and water. The refugee camp at Dadaab, in Kenya, has been overwhelmed by 370,000 people. Farmers unable to meet their basic food costs are abandoning their herds. High cereal and fuel prices had already forced them to sell many animals before the drought and their smaller herds are now unprofitable or dying.The refugee problem may have been preventable. However, violent conflict in the region has deterred international investment in long-term development programmes, which may have reduced the effects of the drought.Development aid would focus on reducing deforestation, topsoil erosion and overgrazing and improving water conservation. New roads and infrastructure for markets would help farmers increase their profits. The result of climate conditions, conflict and lack of investment is that 6.7 million people in Kenya and Ethiopia are currently existing on food rations, and relief agencies estimate 2.6 million in Somalia will need assistance a new emergency operation. BACK{current} of {total}NEXT “They’ve been left with no alternative but to seek shelter and lifesaving help elsewhere.


“We have a duty to help quickly before the situation spirals out of control.”


The UK has pledged £38m ($61m) in food aid to drought-hit Ethiopia – enough to feed 1.3m people for three months.


The DEC appeal will help people in Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia and South Sudan, which will officially separate from the Republic of Sudan on 9 July.


“Of course these people need a long-term solution with investment and political will – but right now it’s about preventing a tragedy,” said Mr Gormley.


Aid agencies, including the Kenyan Red Cross, the Somali Red Crescent and Action Aid, are being helped by local groups to access remote areas with food, water and medical treatment.

More on This Story Related Stories Horn of Africa tested by severe drought 04 JULY 2011, AFRICA UK aid for drought-hit Ethiopia 03 JULY 2011, UK Somalia: Counting the cost of anarchy 26 JANUARY 2011, AFRICA Somalia’s starving pour into violent city 18 JUNE 2011, FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT From other news sites Daily Star Agencies in Africa drought appealFull Story 9 hrs ago The Economist* Hunger in the Horn of Africa: Once more unto the abyss 16 hrs ago Scottish Sun Plea to avert East Africa ‘tragedy’ 18 hrs ago Mirror.co.uk Agencies in Africa drought appeal 27 hrs ago Boston Globe* Triangle of hunger batters millions Africa’s Horn 39 hrs ago About these results* May require registration or subscription Related Internet links Disasters Emergency Committee The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

July 8, 2011

Aid agencies issue drought appeal


Skip to content Skip to local navigation Skip to bbc.co.uk navigation Skip to bbc.co.uk search Help Accessibility Help BBC News UK Home UK Africa Asia-Pac Europe Latin America Mid-East South Asia US & Canada Business Health Sci/Environment Tech Entertainment Video England Northern Ireland Scotland Wales UK Politics Education Magazine 8 July 2011Last updated at 07:59 GMT Share this page Delicious Digg Facebook reddit StumbleUpon Twitter Email Print East Africa drought: DEC appeals for funds Children walk down a dusty street in Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya on July 4, 2011. More than 1,300 people a day are arriving at the Dadaab Refugee camp A group of UK aid agencies has launched a joint fund-raising appeal to help more than 10 million people affected by severe drought in the Horn of Africa.


Thousands of families in desperate need of food and water have trekked for days from Somalia to the Dadaab refugee camp in eastern Kenya.


The drought is the worst in East Africa for 60 years and the UN described it as a “humanitarian emergency”.


The Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) appeal will be broadcast by the BBC.

Continue reading the main storyDisasters Emergency Committee DEC is an umbrella organisation representing a number of aid agencies. Participants in the appeal include ActionAid, Age UK, British Red Cross, Cafod, Care International UK, Christian Aid, Concern Worldwide, Islamic Relief, Merlin, Oxfam, Plan UK, Save the Children, Tearfund and World Vision. To make a donation call 0370 60 60 900, text ‘CRISIS’ to 70000 to donate £5, post a donation to PO Box 999 London EC3A 3AA Disasters Emergency CommitteeHorn of Africa tested by severe droughtSomalia’s starving pour into violent city Comedian Lenny Henry will front the BBC TV appeal while broadcaster Kate Adie will voice the radio version.


The DEC said more than 1,300 people a day were arriving in the Dadaab camp – already thought to be the world’s largest, with a population of 350,000.


A similar number are crossing into Ethiopia, aid workers say.


Many of those reaching the camps are severely malnourished children, some of whom have died soon after arriving.

‘Duty to help’

“Slowly but surely, these people have seen their lives fall apart – crops, livestock and now their homes have been taken by the drought,” DEC chief executive Brendan Gormley said.

Continue reading the main story#main-content.story .layout-block-a .story-body #ss-africa_drought.story-feature{ width: 304px;}h2.dslideshow-header{padding-left: 8px;}#ss-africa_drought.story-feature div.dslideshow-entries dl.dslideshow-entry p{padding-left: 8px;font-weight: bold;}div.dslideshow-entries{margin-top: -33px;}div#ss-africa_drought{border: 1px solid #BDBDBD;} Extended drought is causing a severe food crisis in the Horn of Africa, which includes Kenya, Ethiopia, Djibouti and Somalia. Weather conditions over the Pacific means the rains have failed for two seasons and are unlikely to return until September.Food shortages are affecting up to 12 million people. The UN has not declared a famine but large areas of the region are now classified as in crisis or emergency, with malnutrition affecting up to 35-40% of children under five. The humanitarian problem is made worse by ongoing conflicts, which means that until July militant groups had only allowed aid organisations limited access to large parts of southern Somalia and eastern Ethiopia.Since the beginning of 2011, around 15,000 Somalis each month have fled into refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia looking for food and water. The refugee camp at Dadaab, in Kenya, has been overwhelmed by 370,000 people. Farmers unable to meet their basic food costs are abandoning their herds. High cereal and fuel prices had already forced them to sell many animals before the drought and their smaller herds are now unprofitable or dying.The refugee problem may have been preventable. However, violent conflict in the region has deterred international investment in long-term development programmes, which may have reduced the effects of the drought.Development aid would focus on reducing deforestation, topsoil erosion and overgrazing and improving water conservation. New roads and infrastructure for markets would help farmers increase their profits. The result of climate conditions, conflict and lack of investment is that 6.7 million people in Kenya and Ethiopia are currently existing on food rations, and relief agencies estimate 2.6 million in Somalia will need assistance a new emergency operation. BACK{current} of {total}NEXT “They’ve been left with no alternative but to seek shelter and lifesaving help elsewhere.


“We have a duty to help quickly before the situation spirals out of control.”


The UK has pledged £38m ($61m) in food aid to drought-hit Ethiopia – enough to feed 1.3m people for three months.


The DEC appeal will help people in Kenya, Somalia, Ethiopia and South Sudan, which will officially separate from the Republic of Sudan on 9 July.


“Of course these people need a long-term solution with investment and political will – but right now it’s about preventing a tragedy,” said Mr Gormley.


Aid agencies, including the Kenyan Red Cross, the Somali Red Crescent and Action Aid, are being helped by local groups to access remote areas with food, water and medical treatment.

More on This Story Related Stories Horn of Africa tested by severe drought 04 JULY 2011, AFRICA UK aid for drought-hit Ethiopia 03 JULY 2011, UK Somalia: Counting the cost of anarchy 26 JANUARY 2011, AFRICA Somalia’s starving pour into violent city 18 JUNE 2011, FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT From other news sites Daily Star Agencies in Africa drought appealFull Story 9 hrs ago The Economist* Hunger in the Horn of Africa: Once more unto the abyss 16 hrs ago Scottish Sun Plea to avert East Africa ‘tragedy’ 18 hrs ago Mirror.co.uk Agencies in Africa drought appeal 27 hrs ago Boston Globe* Triangle of hunger batters millions Africa’s Horn 39 hrs ago About these results* May require registration or subscription Related Internet links Disasters Emergency Committee The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites

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July 2, 2011

Intra-court appeal filed over VCs appointment

Intra-court appeal filed over VCs appointment


Lahore: A division bench of the Lahore High Court on Thursday (today) will take up an intra-court appeal against dismissal of petitions by a single bench through which appointment of vice-chancellors for six public sector universities in Punjab was challenged.


Dr Hassan Amir Shah, professor of department of physics at the Government College University, Lahore, filed the appeal.


The division bench comprises Justice Sheikh Azmat Saeed and Justice Muhammad Ameer Bhatti.


A single bench comprising Justice Nasir Saeed Sheikh on June 24 had dismissed several petitions on the matter declaring that the Punjab government’s search committee had been acting lawfully and no irregularities were found in the process of appointment.

July 1, 2011

Appeal filed over VCs appointment

BA/BSc registration

Lahore, July 01: Last date for registration of private candidates, appearing in Punjab University BA/BSc Annual Examination 2012, is June 30, 2011, Thursday (today). The registration forms will be received till 5:00pm in the Registration Branch, Room No. 25, Admin Block, Punjab University, New Campus, Lahore.

PU results: Punjab University Examinations Department has announced the results of MPhil Pak Studies, Semester System, Session 2008-2010, Professional Diploma in Graphic Design, Semester System, Session 2008-2009 & Session 2009-2010, Professional Diploma in Painting, Semester System, Session 2009-2010, Professional Diploma in Textile Design, Semester System, Session 2008-2009, PGD in Human Resource Management, Semester System, Session 2006-2007 and PGD in Business Administration (Evening), Semester System, Session 2008-2009.

Lecture: The Punjab University Department of Gender Studies organised a special lecture on research methodology. According to a press release on Wednesday, the lecture was held for the students who were writing their theses on various issues. Director General Bureau of Statistics Shamim Rafique delivered the lecture. The news

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AIOU VC visits Technology Museum

Lahore: Dr. Nazir Songi, Vice Chancellor, Allama Iqbal Open University, Islamabad visited National Museum of Science and Technology here on Wednesday.

Dr. Mian Muhammad Aslam, Regional Director, Allama Iqbal Open University, Lahore Region accompanied him during the visit. The Vice Chancellor, Allama Iqbal Open University and the Director General, National Museum of Science and Technology Khalid Iqbal Yasir exchanged views on various aspects of science education and discussed future projects and programmes in collaboration between the two esteemed national educational institutions to improve and promote in the public mind and the students, an interest for science and technology and develop a scientific attitude in the masses. The nation

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Intra-court appeal filed over VCs appointment

Lahore: A division bench of the Lahore High Court on Thursday (today) will take up an intra-court appeal against dismissal of petitions by a single bench through which appointment of vice-chancellors for six public sector universities in Punjab was challenged.

Dr Hassan Amir Shah, professor of department of physics at the Government College University, Lahore, filed the appeal.

The division bench comprises Justice Sheikh Azmat Saeed and Justice Muhammad Ameer Bhatti.

A single bench comprising Justice Nasir Saeed Sheikh on June 24 had dismissed several petitions on the matter declaring that the Punjab government’s search committee had been acting lawfully and no irregularities were found in the process of appointment.

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VCs’ case Judge refuses to hear ICA
Lahore: Justice Sheikh Azmat Saeed of the Lahore High Court on Thursday refused to hear an intra-court appeal against the dismissal of petitions by a single bench through which appointment of vice chancellors for six public sector universities in Punjab was challenged.

Heading a division bench, Justice Saeed observed that since he was a member of the Government College University syndicate it would not be appropriate for him to proceed with the case.

He referred the appeal to the chief justice and requested to fix it before any other appropriate bench. Dr Hasan Amir Shah, professor of department of physics at the Government College University, Lahore, filed the appeal through a senior lawyer, Anwar Kamal. Dawn

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Pak students in Manchester

Lahore: A delegation of position holder students visited Manchester City during a study tour of United Kingdom. A hand out here on Wednesday, said the tour has been arranged by Punjab Chief Minister Mian Shahbaz Sharif. There, the delegation visited British Muslim Heritage Centre, which is a 150 years old gothic style building. The centre provides facilities for conferences, meetings, exhibitions, and social activities. They also attended a reception arranged by the President Pakistan Muslim League-N Ijaz Ahmad Awan. The news

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Numl students display artworks
Islamabad: The students of National University of Modern Languages (Numl) displayed their artworks at an exhibition on the campus.

Jointly organised by students and the faculty, over a dozen participants displayed almost 250 items of their artworks in different categories such as regional art and craft, miniature paintings and calligraphic works, oil painting, graphic designing, printmaking and flower arrangements.

“The aim of this exhibition during summer course is to provide students a chance to showcase their artistic talents,” said student affair committee member, Shazia Rose.

The participants showcased their works representing Pakistani culture, Muslim art and modern art.

Featuring over 30 artistic items of Mohammad Bilal Qureshi, the exhibition also depicted different aspects of nature through landscapes, flowers, sketch work and figurative imagery. The young artists utilised various media, including water colour, pen and pencil, oil on canvas and collage. “Art is a vast field through which one can see natural things in different angles and I tried to represent my culture and people,” said young artist Bilal Qureshi. Sketches of pots and buildings, fantasy figures and contemporary images dominated his paintings in water colours, oil paintings and pencil work.

Amna Butt displayed her textile work and glass painting of Sana Jafri and Sundas decorated the display area while in the discipline of calligraphy the participants worked on dynamic pieces of art influenced by Islamic art.

The highlight of the exhibition was the work done in the field of pencil sketching, oil painting, dry pastels, soft pastels and glass painting and photography, textile designing. The students designed vase, tablecloth, napkins, glass, boxes, rugs, wall hangings and bottles in an innovative way to attract visitors. Dawn

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