Posts tagged ‘Still’

July 8, 2011

Japan quake still hurting trade

Car manufacturing unit Japanese carmakers were some of the hardest hit, facing supply shortages and power cuts Japan’s current account surplus fell sharply in May, as the 11 March earthquake and tsunami continue to affect exports.


The surplus shrank 51.7% to 590.7bn yen ($7.27bn; £4.55bn) compared with a year earlier, said the Ministry of Finance.


However, that is less than most analysts had expected.


The data shows that while the economy continues to suffer from the disaster, it is recovering quicker than expected.


May’s fall in the current account surplus marks the third straight monthly drop after the earthquake and tsunami wreaked havoc in the north east of Japan.


In April the surplus was down 69.5%.

Trade deficit

Even as the supply chain recovers and manufacturers come back online exports are still suffering.


The data showed that exports fell by 9.8% in May from a year earlier.


While imports rose 14.7%, mainly because of higher energy costs.


That translated to the second-biggest trade deficit on record, the ministry said.


The current account is the broadest measure of a country’s trade with the rest of the world.

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July 2, 2011

Seminar: Balochistan rights package; the glass is still ‘half-empty’

Speakers call for change in Islamabad’s mindset towards province.

ISLAMABAD: 

Vague implementation mechanism and lack of true representation in the provincial assembly is rendering Aghaz-i-Huqooq-i-Balochistan package slow and ineffective in delivering on Baloch people’s longstanding demand for rights. This was observed by a majority of speakers, particularly those belonging to nationalist parties of the restive province, at a seminar on  ‘Aghaz-i-Haqooq-i-Balochistan Package: Status and way forward’ held here on Thursday.

“The Balochis have been given constitutional guarantee to their rights under the 18th Amendment but the laws still remain unimplemented,” said Central Vice-President National Party, Dr Ishaq Baloch.

He added that the Balochistan problem could not be resolved until the federal government accepts and respects ethnic diversity in the country and gives them a right on their resources. Blaming successive governments for continuously treating Balochistan with discrimination for decades, Baloch said ‘Federation could only be saved if the federating units were truly recognised.’

Former Deputy Speaker of the National Assembly Wazir Ahmed Jogazai supported him, saying the Balochistan Assembly lacks true representation due to political polarisation in the province.

He stressed the need for establishment of an independent election commission, which could hold free and fair elections to ‘replace the current provincial government which lacks integrity and legitimacy.’

Pointing to the lack of implementation mechanism of Balochistan rights package, Raza Narejo, an expert on Balochistan affairs, said the mechanism for all political, administrative and constitutional matters must be in place, and tracking implementation should also be easily accessible.

Aziz Jamali, a government official working on the package’s implementation admitted that though the pace was slow, the government had managed to provide more than 5,000 jobs to the unemployed Baloch. An increased flow of financial resources to the provincial government was also made possible.

Former federal minister from Balochistan, Ayatullah Durrani of Pakistan Peoples Party agreed with Senator Haji Adeel of Awami National Party  that the implementation of the 39-point package was slow at present.

However, both the leaders urged upon the critics to look at the ‘half full glass’ than ‘half being empty’. They pointed out that the tripling of federal financial resources for Balochistan for the fiscal 2011-2012 beginning on July 1 this year, would not have been possible without the package.

Holding the Balochi sardars and tribal chieftains responsible for the injustices to the Balochi people, Ayatullah Durrani questioned as to ‘why not a single educational institution has been constructed by Jogezai, Jamalis, Achakzais, Bugtis and Raisanis’. Some of the speakers also demanded a change in Islamabad’s ‘mindset towards Balochistan’.

Published in The Express Tribune, July 2nd, 2011.

June 30, 2011

My Karachi 2010

my karachi 2010 exhibition
my karachi 2010

About Karachi

Karachi is the largest city, seaport and the financial capital of Pakistan and the capital of the province of Sindh. It is the ninth largest city of the world in terms of metropolitan population,[4] and is Pakistan’s premier centre of banking, industry, and trade. Karachi is also the home of Pakistan’s largest corporations that are involved in textiles, shipping, automotive industry, entertainment, arts, fashion, advertising, publishing, software development and medical research. It also serves as a major hub of higher education in South Asia, and the wider Islamic World.

Karachi enjoys its prominent position due to its geographical location on a bay, making it the financial capital of the country. It is one of the fastest growing cities in the world. It was the original capital of Pakistan until the construction of Islamabad, and is the location of the Port of Karachi, Port Bin Qasim, one of the region’s largest and busiest ports. The city’s population has increased dramatically after the Partition of British India forced hundreds of thousands of refugees from India to settle in the city. Since independence from Britain in 1947, the city’s vibrant economy has attracted migrants from all over Pakistan, surrounding countries such as Iran, Tajikistan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, China, Bangladesh, Afghanistan and further beyond. Despite a history of political turmoil, the city continues to attract those seeking prosperity and has shown consistent growth.

Karachi city is spread over 3,530 km² (1,363 sq mi) in area. It is locally known as the “City of Lights” for its liveliness, and the “City of the Quaid”, having been the birth and burial place of Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan, who also made the city his home after Pakistan’s independence

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